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KGlennon's Contribution Portal

About KGlennon
Kielty received a Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education with a concentration in Environmental Education from Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania. Kielty holds teaching certifications in Elementary Education, Environment Education, as well as Mid-Level Science.

In an effort to combat child obesity and introduce nutritious foods to children, Kielty has helped to develop many inquiry based Math and Science lesson plans by implementing fruits and vegetables into lessons.

Outside of the Classroom Kielty enjoys exploring local nature trails either on her bike or with her two dogs. Her favorite nutrious food is a strawberry avocado salsa- yum!

Submitted Lesson Plans
  • Use blueberries to show students how to group, graph and compare.


    | Average Rating: 2.9 of 5


    Grade Level: K1

  • Will a cranberry bounce?  Will it float? How many cranberries does it take to make a gallon of cranberry juice? 

    Grab some cranberries and use your skills in estimation, buoyancy,


    | Average Rating: 3.1 of 5


    Grade Level: 34

  • Would you ever eat the root, stalk or leaf of a plant?  Let's take a closer look at the vegetables we like to eat and what part of the plant they come from! 


    | Average Rating: 3.3 of 5


    Grade Level: 345

  • Let's use some knowledge of acidic propreties to see the inside of the egg without cracking it open.  We're not yolking around with this one!


    | Average Rating: 3.2 of 5


    Grade Level: 345

  • A fun activity that includes making yogurt from live bacteria cultures!


    | Average Rating: 3.2 of 5


    Grade Level: K12345

  • Did you know that a tomato is really a fruit, not a vegetable?  Well, there are more foods that you have probably miscategorized- this lesson is going to make you go bananas!


    | Average Rating: 2.8 of 5


    Grade Level: 3456

  • It was the Greeks who originally discovered the patterns of triangular and square numbers by rearranging pebbles into the geometric shapes, and you can too- but we think blueberries may be more del


    | Average Rating: 3.2 of 5


    Grade Level: 12345

  • We'll use peanuts as our visual to count and determine the perimeter of shapes.


    | Average Rating: 4.0 of 5


    Grade Level: 34

  • Did you know that you can determine the pH properties of some liquid substances using cabbage leaves?  Yes! Determine if your pH is acidic, neutral, or basic all by the colors your cabbag


    | Average Rating: 3.6 of 5


    Grade Level: 67891011

  • Use chick peas, as well as many other beans, to estimate, sort and classify in this simple math lesson.


    | Average Rating: 3.5 of 5


    Grade Level: K12

  • How can you plant 10 Carambola Trees in five rows and have exactly four trees in each row? The answer lies in the fruit of the tree. 

     


    | Average Rating: 4.0 of 5


    Grade Level: 5678

  • Spirals are present everywhere in nature. They are evident in weather, plants, animals, and even humans.


    | Average Rating: 0 of 5


    Grade Level: 234

  • Tessellations are patterns where there is no overlapping or gaps.
    Any square, triangular, or hexagonal cracker can be used to create tessellations.


    | Average Rating: 3.1 of 5


    Grade Level:

  • Nature has many mysterious ways.  One of them is the presence of stars, or pentagonal symmetry. 


    | Average Rating: 3.3 of 5


    Grade Level: K1

  • A classic bar trick that can be used to teach students to observe the centrifugal force of nature.


    | Average Rating: 3.4 of 5


    Grade Level: 101112

  • Swiss Chard is a great leaf to use when examining the structure of a leaf due to its large size and the contrast in color from the stem to its leaf.


    | Average Rating: 3.3 of 5


    Grade Level:

  • Lemons and Limes, they're the same. Well, except for the color, taste... and density.


    | Average Rating: 2.9 of 5


    Grade Level: 5678

  • Not all fruits produce the same amount of seeds.  Some fruits have many seeds inside of them for more chance of replanting their seeds.  Other fruits have one, large seed or a pit that th


    | Average Rating: 3.2 of 5


    Grade Level:

  • Plants need Water and Sunlight to Survive, but what about plants that live in the desert where there is very little to no rain?


    | Average Rating: 3.3 of 5


    Grade Level:

  • Endoskeletons and Exoskeletons


    | Average Rating: 3.6 of 5


    Grade Level:

  • Imagine a picnic without bees! Marvelous, delightful, bee sting free... except, after this lesson you'll realize there wouldn't even be a picnic without bees!


    | Average Rating: 2.9 of 5


    Grade Level: 456

  • Why does everyone want to sit next to the mushroom in the cafeteria?  Because he's a really fungi! 

    Make a mushroom spore print and see how mushrooms reproduce!


    | Average Rating: 3.2 of 5


    Grade Level:

  • A classic- but easy experiment to show how plants are able to absorb water and nutrients through a process called transpirational pull.

    By cutting the stalk of celery in half, you are able


    | Average Rating: 3.3 of 5


    Grade Level:

  • When you eat fresh produce and meat you're a consumer of energy from the sun.  Use this outdoors activity to demonstrate to students how energy is lost through the food chain.


    | Average Rating: 3.2 of 5


    Grade Level: 5

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